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5 Tips for Hiking and Backpacking During Your Period


by Sara Thompson June 01, 2016

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Your Period Will Never Keep You Off the Trail Again!

How To Handle Your Period While Hiking, Backpacking, and Camping

Your period can be an uncomfortable experience and the thought of dealing with it while hiking and backpacking can keep even the most adventurous girl off the trail. With a few tips though, dealing with your period while on a backpacking or camping trip isn't any different from dealing with it at work or school. In fact, according to WebMD, exercise and hiking actually helps reduce the pain and discomfort of cramps.

 

1. The Bear Myth

5 Tips for Handling Your Period While Hiking and Backpacking

I was on my period during my first backpacking trip. We hiked into Lunch Lake in Olympic National Park where black bears are a common sight. I was terrified that I would attract hungry bears from all over the park but my boyfriend assured me I had nothing to worry about. He insisted that it was a myth that bears are attracted to women on their period. Luckily, he was right and when we did encounter a bear a few hundred yards off the trail, it showed no interest in eating me.

More Info: Yellowstone National Park's Frequently Asked Questions: Grizzly Bears

  

2. Leave the Pads at Home When Backpacking

5 Tips for Handling Your Period While Hiking and Backpacking

When backpacking and hiking opt for tampons over pads. Tampons are more comfortable and less messy, ensuring you have a great day on the trail. Look for a tampon that is unscented because although your period might not attract bears, scented products can. If you want to reduce how much waste you pack out you can also opt for a tampon without a plastic applicator. And for the ultra-light backpacking Ladies who want to minimize every ounce in their pack, consider a reusable menstrual cup

  

3. Bring Unscented Wipes and Hand Sanitizer

5 Tips for Handling Your Period While Hiking and Backpacking

If the weather is warm, nothing beats jumping in a mountain lake and washing away the sweat and grime accumulated from a day of hiking. However, when that isn't an option unscented wipes are a woman's best friend. Who ever said it was diamonds obviously wasn't outdoorsy! Keep unscented wipes and hand sanitizer in your toiletry kit so you can easily clean up as needed. 

 

4. Stock Your First Aid Kit with Pain Reliever

5 Tips for Handling Your Period While Hiking and Backpacking

You know your body, if you usually take pain reliever or other supplements to help with discomfort and cramps, a backpacking trip isn't the time to go without. Most first aid kits contain some form of pain killer, but you should add your favorite option to your kit as a backup. 

 

5. Leave No Trace 

5 Tips for Handling Your Period While Hiking and Backpacking

Anytime you hit the trail you should be doing your best to leave no trace. When dealing with your period that means packing out tampons (paper products should never be buried). The easiest way to do this is to place them in doubled ziplock bags. This will ensure there are no leaks or odors escaping. For added privacy give the inner bag a quick coat of spray paint, so if you need to pull everything out of your pack, no one will see the contents. 

More Info: The Principles of Leave No Trace

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Sara Thompson
Sara Thompson

Author

Sara is a Pacific Northwest native that enjoys skiing, kayaking, mountain biking, and hiking with her adventure dog Wally.






2 Responses

David
David

November 23, 2016

Backpack are really best friend for any hiker and traveller. Some people want to go hiking with their child who who are 2-5 years old. To carry this child we need to take Best baby hiking backpack as a baby carrier. When you take a baby carrier you will take a lot of thinks backpack. This post give me a powerful information about baby hiking backpack. Thanks for your informative post.

Sarara
Sarara

June 18, 2016

Firstly – same name buddies!
Second – Great tips! I’ve always wondered about period hiking. Usually I just plan hikes around my cycle but now I’m not as worried.

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